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NEXUS-IBA and Milano Ventures Ltd. partnership

NEXUS-IBA selects Milano Ventures as partner

NEXUS-IBA selects Milano Ventures Ltd as global service partner

NEXUS-International Broadcasting Association (NEXUS-IBA, Milan, Italy) is a non-profit association founded in 1990. NEXUS-IBA provides its membership all necessary means for the effective dissemination of content on radio, TV, the Internet and any media in general. NEXUS-IBA reaches very country in the world. Radio and TV broadcasters from all-over the world make use of NEXUS-IBA’s Internet media streaming & distribution, radio, TV and satellite broadcasting services to reach audiences worldwide.

From Dublin, Ireland, Milano Ventures offers content media delivery services worldwide both to NEXUS-IBA’s members and commercial clients. Services offered by Milano Ventures include: international broadcasting, disaster recovery, professional email, software and application development, domain registration, web marketing & SEO, high reliability WorldDirector cloud hosting and related consulting services.

Get on the air on shortwave, satellite or streaming

Get on the air now!

Milano Ventures merges the competences and share the values of NEXUS-IBA in offering strategic consultancy and opportunities to international broadcasters, either secular and Christian, to reach any country in the world via International radio and satellite, and with the most advanced cloud technologies, including streaming and online media.

Be like the BBC (*), VOA, CNN, Radio France Internationale, The Deutsche Welle  (*), Al Jazeera or your favourite international broadcaster and cover the world with a single broadcast, at less than the cost of one market on FM or terrestrial TV at home.

(*) The BBC World Service and Deutsche Welle are among the many world international broadcasters hosted on our station in Milan, Italy. As a NEXUS-IBA member, they broadcasted live headline news and information to the English speaking community in Milan.

Africa and Asia satellite coverage

Africa and Asia satellite coverage

NEXUS-IBA and Milano Ventures help you reaching any world corner, using the most powerful station in the world, with more than 40 Million Watts (up to 43 MW ERP) on Shortwave radio, or via satellite and Internet streaming.

Secular and Christian broadcasting

Secular and religious broadcasting

 

Milano Ventures and NEXUS-IBA do not discriminate against race, sex, language, or political or religious beliefs. We promote pluralism of information, with particular attention to minorities, and above all ethnic, cultural, political, and religious minorities.

Over IPAR (International Public Acces Radio) we promote news and feature programs in English and any other language that deals with sensitive issues such as freedom of speech or are targeted to regions where freedom of speech is at stake, the Internet may be blocked, and mass communication media censored.

Over European Gospel Radio we promote Christian and religious programs aimed at worldwide evangelism, hosting any preacher, Minister, Church, missionary religious organisation or anyone who has something to say to “preach to the world”.

Over our mainstream streaming channels or via client’s dedicated audio (radio) and video (TV) channels we offer a 24/7 presence accessible anywhere in the world. We use our WorldDirector cloud, not necessarily controlled by any of the major cloud providers or Governments, running on an independent Content Delivery Network (CDN) with Point of Access servers spread across the entire world.

We think that our offer is a unique opportunity to any broadcaster or program producer to reach any country in the world, without barriers, using Shortwave radio, Satellite, AM or Medium Wave radio and internet streaming, in any possible combination.

Our audience is your audience

Program producerInternational broadcasting is a lot like advertising: everybody agrees that it works, but it is difficult to quantify. The world’s largest broadcasting organisations have been deeply involved in audience research costing vast sums of money.

Even the largest International broadcasters on cannot accurately estimate the size of their audience to any program they air, to the same or even a comparable level of accuracy than any FM or TV station can do for any particular market.

Since 1979, NEXUS-IBA has been working with several Radio Ministries, the BBC, the United Nations, UNESCO and other major International broadcasters and media, and with those involved in audience and International media research. Only the largest organisations like the BBC or Voice of America can afford the cost of conducting some audience research on Shortwave.

Some empirical data exists on the number of Shortwave receivers in each country, that lead to a potential audience of more than ten million in Europe and about the same in N Africa and the Middle East. These are regions that we can cover with a Grade-A signal using a 50 to 150 kW service on Shortwave. Most of the time we know that people are listening, because we monitor our signal quality continuously in several countries, and because listeners write us and to our members or program producers.

Graham Mytton, former Head of Audience Research of the BBC, stated:

People will go through the trouble of listening to shortwave, even when reception is difficult, if it provides something that they otherwise cannot get.

Our experience, in fact, is that – if your program has an impact, and is not available on local FM/AM – then people will tune into your program to listen to it. Someone calls it word-of-mouth propagation, and for this reason and our long-standing experience we are well known among Shortwave listeners worldwide for our high-quality radio relay services, at non-profit cost.

Most of our broadcasters and program producers do tremendous work to advertise their broadcasts among their churches or community members overseas. Once they know that we provide an excellent signal in the target area, then they tune and may call other people to listen to, in a snow-balling effect. This is something you have to consider doing when you start airing, i.e. using your existing contacts to spread the news about time, frequency and area that we cover. We can provide help to people tuning in, and we usually forward letters or email addressed at the station that mentions your program, but we cannot often go as far as keeping you connected with the audience of your program. You should consider this as part of your mission as a Shortwave Broadcaster!

For all the talk of satellite radio and TV, Shortwave radio remains the most cost-effective electronic mass medium that can span enormous distances instantly and penetrate into every home in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific. Also, Shortwave radio is portable and is a companion wherever one goes. It is indeed the world’s most mobile electronic mass medium. Modern Shortwave receivers are ultra-compact, inexpensive, and very easy to use.

On Satellite, we can distribute your radio and TV signal via satellites around the world.

Where Internet is available, beyond the digital divide, we also complement our services with simultaneous audio (radio) streaming.

Build your own radio station

Build your own radio or TV station

Milano Ventures and NEXUS will create your audio channels or your streaming radio station from scratch, including a visual player to be hosted on your website. Your streaming radio station can be based on your content, music, news, live events. We can also help locating and integrating news, information and additional material to create a loyal audience. Typical applications include in-store radio, Church or Christian radio, group or interest-based radio, news radio services, music, political, foreign or vernacular language service.

Marketing, SEO and lead generation

marketing, SEO and lead generation fro your company or organisation

Milano Ventures and NEXUS also help your organisation to create a modern communication strategy, i.e. creating real opportunities to make an impact with innovative services, such as marketing automation, fundraising, lead generation, on-demand marketing, online presence and social media management. NEXUS-IBA and Milano Ventures help secular and Christian organisations to increase fund-raising opportunities and to fund their mission and outreaching Ministries.

Continuous innovation and research in new technologies

Innovation in new technologies

With the help of Milano Ventures, the NEXUS association strengthens its position as Innovator and Technology Mediator or facilitator. We enable NEXUS-IBA’s members worldwide, as well as end-users, to make full use of innovation and the recent developments of technology in media, including broadcasting, social media and the Internet.

Our volunteers

our volunteers

People volunteering for NEXUS-IBA are professionals, teachers, university professors and researchers, journalists, students and engineers, most of them devoting their spare time and resources as a public service to the global community. On June 15, 1995, NEXUS-International Broadcasting Association was officially approved for association with the Department of Public Information of the United Nations, and for more than 20 years has been actively working in promoting the work and activities of both UN and UNESCO. Researchers at NEXUS-IBA created the first load-balanced cloud and Content Delivery Network (CDN) called WorldDirector, later used by Milano Ventures and their clients in Europe and USA.

Innovation in the Cloud

Innovaton in the cloud and internet

Most of Internet and cloud-related services and applications are delivered to end users, fast and reliably over the WorldDirector platform, including streaming audio and video services on behalf of our stations and members.

About the NEXUS term

NEXUS-IBA team: the cultural radio link

The NEXUS term was chosen because this Latin word says it all: a link or point of connection, using international media, radio, TV and cloud services to link content providers with their audiences. But NEXUS also stands for more than just a physical connection using a variety of technologies. It also means World communication and promoting freedom of speech around the world. When an individual or an organisation becomes part of NEXUS-IBA, they are part of a dynamic, highly professional and creative team devoted to utilising the latest technologies to deliver their content at the lowest possible cost.

Milano Ventures, Dublin, Ireland

 

 

 

Milano Ventures (Dublin, Ireland) is proud to be selected NEXUS-IBA’s partner to service their membership and commercial clients, service and and maintain their cloud and broadcasting infrastructure across all continents.

Hello There archives

Hello There

The Hello There the listeners’ mailbag program, was just about the only production of NEXUS-IBA and regularly broadcasted IRRS-Shortwave (“I-double-R-S Shortwave, the Italian Radio Relay Service”. Alfredo Cotroneo, one of the founders of NEXUS-IBA,  hosted the program from 1989 until the late 1990s. He read and answered questions sent in by snail mail from all over the world.

During the early years of operation, the most exciting letters on the Hello There program were coming from Eastern Europe, i.e.  from East Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland, Romania, Hungary, and of course from the former Soviet Union (USSR). Shortwave was – at that time – the only way to receive news and information from the West, and IRRS-Shortwave was quite loud and clear all over Europe, and, most importantly, being a small, independent, non-governmental station, had never been jammed by Eastern European governments.

Letters to IRRS and the Hello There program were often smuggled across the East-West Berlin border by couriers and had an address in West Berlin for any reply to be sent to. Sometimes letters came directly from behind the iron curtain to our famous PO Box 10980 mail address in Milan (this address is no more active since 2015), and occasionally they were opened, and paragraphs were obliterated using sturdy coloured ink by censors.

The Hello There program ran initially for 30 minutes but was reduced to 15 minutes during the last few years until it was suspended. It included occasional phone interviews on technology, the early use of the Internet, international broadcasting, DXing and pirate radio.

Besides being broadcast on Shortwave from Milan, Italy, some the excerpts presented here were also part of the first RealAudio tests at Internet Radio NEXUS dating back to 1995. They have been converted to MP3 format are kept online for historical reasons only, and may have no actuality value. Due to recent cuts in our budget, we are unable to bring you these items on a regular basis as much as we would like to do. Please consider becoming a NEXUS-IBA sponsor.

On March 28, 1998,  the glorious HF broadcasting station at Schwarzenburg, just a few kilometres out of Bern, the capital of Switzerland, was shut down forever. At NEXUS-IBA we have special memories linked to the technicians and the station itself, as both of our first 10 kW Siemens transmitters that were previously used by Berna Radio’s aeronautical service come from the Schwarzenburg broadcasting station. Still, on old tube radio receivers around Europe, you may find the word Schwarzenburg on the illuminated scale, but now the Schwarzenburg station has been wholly dismantled and won’t be on the air anymore. Founded in 1934, Switzerland’s shortwave voice was heard from this glorious station around the world even during world war II as one of the few sources of reliable and objective information.

The Swiss PTT operated the HF transmitting station at Schwarzenburg until the end of 1997 when Swisscom took over as a private company. The station itself was used for telephony transmissions around the world, for aeronautical and maritime services, and also by SRI, Swiss Radio International, that for a few more years continued transmitting on shortwave from other locations in Europe and around the world.

You can hear the whole story from the two Bobs (Bob Thomann and Bob Zanotti), who, sadly, and for the last time, reported from the transmitter room in Schwarzenburg.

 

Farewell to Schwarzenburg, March 28, 1998, by the two Bobs [20:21]

by Bob Thomann and Bob Zanotti (Swiss Radio International)

A tribute to the two Bobs : Bob Thomann and Bob Zanotti and their last "Swiss Merry goes round" [14:36]

Special on Waco & sects (part1) (from Hello There) [31:01]

Special on Waco & sects (part2) (from Hello There) [25:48]

VideoCrypt Hacking on European satellite TV (from Hello There) [13:39]

Pirate Radio in Canada: Pirate Rambo [08:37]

Interview with Bill Pfeiffer - Moderator of rec.radio.broadcasting - on micro-radio (from Hello There) [13:26]

Interview with Universal Life's Primordial Christians (from Hello There) [13:51]

NEXUS-IBA DEMOS project

NEXUS-IBA awarded large contract under the European Union's 5th Framework Program (DEMOS)

NEXUS-IBA awarded large contract under the European Union’s 5th Framework Program (Information Society Technologies, Key Action I.4.2, ‚On-line Support to Democratic Processes‘).

Milano, Italy, Sept. 1, 2000 —:  NEXUS-IBA has been awarded a large contract for the development of DEMOS (Delphi Mediation Online System), a web-based platform whose primary objective is to enable fruitful and constructive debate between citizens and politicians with the intention of facilitating and encouraging “online-democracy”. DEMOS is an international Research & Development project funded by the European Commission (IST-1999-20530). Partners in the DEMOS project come from a broad range of institutions and companies, all sharing a mutual interest in counteracting against the apparent disenchantment with politics, which has become a challenge for democracy.

NEXUS-IBA’s interest in DEMOS is also related to its use in large opinion polls and qualitative analysis in general, and we will be testing other possible uses in the following areas: consumer surveys, focus groups, media analysis, consulting, advertising research, market research for products and brands, customer satisfaction research, media research, and public opinion including political and corporate image surveys.

DEMOS may in several cases reduce significantly the cost of running any medium-large scale survey on a rather large group of population. The DEMOS software and methodology itself, in fact, will be able to reach very high-quality results due to the continuous refinement of results.

For more information also visit the DEMOS project web site at: http://www.demos-project.org/

With its seat in Milano, Italy, NEXUS-International Broadcasting Association is a non-profit association founded in 1988. Our aims are to provide all necessary means at our disposal for the dissemination of content on radio and the Internet. 

Today the association is re-focusing as a technology mediator or facilitator, to enable end-users to make full use of the recent developments of technology, media and the Internet. To fulfill its aims NEXUS-IBA also offers several services as an International Internet Service Provider, and is involved in  training programs aimed to teachers and parents on the role of emerging technologies. People working for NEXUS-IBA are professionals, teachers, professors, journalists, students and engineers devoting their spare time and resources as a public service to the global community. 

On June 15, 1995, NEXUS-International Broadcasting Association was officially approved for association with the Department of Public Information of the United Nations. 

NEXUS-IBA created and maintains a Content Delivery Network (CDN) in Europe and the USA created with an internally developed technology called “WorldDirector”, where several Internet related services and applications are delivered to end users, including streaming audio and video. 

In 2001 NEXUS-IBA created a commercial spin-off (WORNEX International S.r.l., http://www.wornex.com) that is currently marketing the WorldDirector technology and services worldwide.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

NEXUS-International Broadcasting Association,
phone: +39-02-2666971
email: info@nexus.org

More pictures of the HF station at Schwarzenburg (1938-1998)

Check the full article on the Swiss the HF station at Schwarzenburg here

The Schwarzenburg HF transmitting station (1938-1998)

The curtain array at Schwarzenburg

The Schwarzenburg HF transmitting station (1938-1998)

1934: First steps: Studio Basel compiles weekly transmissions for Swiss abroad.

1935: First Shortwave outlets to North and South America via transmitters of the League of Nations, known as the “Voelkerbund”, operated by the Radio Suisse Co. in Prangins, near Geneva.

The curtain array at Schwarzenburg

1937: Weekly outlets in the three Swiss national languages, and features such as the “Week in Switzerland”, spoken correspondence, sports results etc. These transmissions took on so well that construction of an own transmitting centre was considered. The Swiss PTT was given then mandate to evaluate a suitable location. As a result, a wide plane near Schwarzenburg was chosen.

1938: The Swiss Parliament agreed to the project and shortly after, construction started.

The two Bobs at the Schwarzenburg Shortwave station in 1998

Bob Zanotti (left) and Bob Thomann (right), last guests at Schwarzenburg on 28 March 1998

1939:     Early spring, the station was completed, but on July 6, the station was destroyed by a big fire, allegedly due to a human shortcoming. Prangins took over helpfully the transmissions again, while reconstruction of the Schwarzenburg site began immediately and was even extended to contain additional transmitters for overseas radiotelephony, which became an important item, due to the aggravating political situation in Europe: WW-II was about to break out.

Early construction at Schwarzenburg in 1938

Early construction at Schwarzenburg in 1938

1939/1940:     Just about three months after its outbreak the Schwarzenburg transmitting site was rebuilt and became operational with two 25 Kilowatt AM Hasler transmitters and a few rotating Rhombic Antennas. At the same time, Radiotelephone Terminal Equipment was installed in the Main Post Office in Bern, where the technical and switchboard operators were about to connect telephone customers over the SW transmitters to various destinations, such as New York and Lisbon.

Bob Zanotti with an earlier transmitter at the Schwarzenburg

Bob Zanotti with an earlier transmitter at the Schwarzenburg “museum”. The station and its close-doors museum was shut down on March 29, 1998.

Swiss borders becoming blocked by the Nazi occupation of Europe, the Swiss had to build up their overseas supply using their merchant fleet with the main unloading harbours in Lisbon and Genoa. To avoid being torpedoed by German submarines, the ships positions were broadcasted daily via Schwarzenburg and picked up also by the German Marine HQ, so the Germans knew exactly where the neutral Swiss ships were. The ships themselves were in wireless contact via special services operated by the Radio Suisse Co. in Duebendorf near Zurich.

Using Radio amateur equipment: The construction of new additional transmitters was rather slow, Kurt Wydler, one of the first technicians of the station, a radio amateur (HB9DS) has just finished his Amateur-transmitter, but with the outbreak of the War, all Radio amateur equipment was confiscated by the PTT. Wydler’s transmitter, however, was sent back to Schwarzenburg, where a final 500 Watt amplifier was built and added – and was put into continuous operation for broadcasting.

1941: A 2.5 kW Western-Electric SSB transmitter was installed, by the way, that was the first SSB equipment in Switzerland, and at the Radio terminal in Bern also WE-Terminals and a special 5-band Speech- privacy to scramble the telephone communications were put into service. This was the beginning of an SSB-link between Switzerland and the US. The transmitting site was in Lawrenceville and the receiving station at Whiteplains, NY.

1946: After the War, continental communication saw a tremendous boom, which called for additional Equipment. Ten standard, 4-kW transmitters were installed, plus a 40 kW final amplifier.

The 25 kW AM transmitters at Schwarzenburg

1952: In addition to the Rhombic antennas, a new curtain-antenna-array was built and fed with almost one kilometre long 300 Ohm parallel feeder lines.

1960: The huge rotatable Swedish Allgon log-periodic antenna was built, which could carry 250 kW. also new matching the 250 kW BBC and Marconi transmitters joined the Hasier Equipment and shortly after, quite some 30 kW Siemens- SSB-transmitters were added. These Siemens were exclusively for the Radiotelephony service.

The 2.5 kW SSB Western Electric transmitter

The Sixties also saw half a dozen new 40 kW rotating log-period antennas to provide the fast-evolving radiotelephone service which included some 30 circuits to stations all around the world, some of them using the new Lincompex technique which improved the speech quality a lot, and which also allowed direct dialling.

So the Schwarzenburg transmitter served several purposes: broadcasting, radiotelephony and in:

1971: still a new Service was introduced: BERNA-RADIO, to provide wireless communication with air crafts aloft. Starting out with our national Airline Swissair, soon after many national, European and international airlines joined this practical instrument, to keep in touch with their home bases for all kind of communication. It proved quite handy when an aircraft had troubles of any kind so that the flight engineer could get immediate assistance from the company trouble-shooter. For this service, two new, fast switching and remote controllable 10 kW Siemens transmitters were added (these transmitters were later acquired by NEXUS-IBA and used to start IRRS-Shortwave’s European service).

one of the twin Siemens transmitters later modified for A3A, reduced carrier USB, and in operation since 1987 from IRRS-Shortwave's facility in Milano, Italy

NEXUS-IBA’s TX #1, one of the twin Siemens transmitters later modified for A3A, reduced carrier USB, and in operation since 1987 from IRRS-Shortwave’s facility in Milano, Italy, serving Europe, N. Africa and the Middle East. These fully automatic, fast switching transmitters were used by Berna Radio’s aeronautical service at Schwarzenburg to connect Swissair’s aircrafts flying all over the world to their company headquarters in Switzerland. NEXUS-IBA acquired them when IRRS-Shortwave started its transmissions in October 1987.

It is sad news indeed to report that this aeronautical service of Berna-Radio will also come to an end sometime in 1998, as aircraft communication has been veered to satellites, which provide 24 hours access, whereas HF Communications – as we all know, are subject to propagation conditions and occasional freaks.

Paul Stettler at control board in Schwarzenburg

It is indeed with some sadness and nostalgia, that we have to accept the closure of the legendary Schwarzenburg transmitting station, but all those having taken part from the very beginning it up and kept it running for almost sixty years can certainly look back to a most interesting era with the sure feeling, having accomplished a most rewarding task, and a job was well done, that’s for sure!

But nothing lasts forever. So we do have to accept the new age in which Shortwave broadcasting will – still for many years – be very much in evidence, and so will Swiss Radio International! The 500 kW transmitting station near Sottens in the French part of Switzerland will continue operation. The Schwarzenburg frequencies will be aired from stations in Juelich, Germany, and relay-stations in Africa, South America and the Far East.

The European outlet of 6165 kHz still in Lenk, in the Bernese Oberland, will also come to an end sometime in 1988, and that frequency will also most likely continue to be heard from a Juelich transmitter – i.e. from one of the Deutsche Welle’s transmitting sites. SRI will most likely also be heard Internet in the future, and can be picked up from satellites as well as on many cable systems.

So much from the history of the Shortwave transmitting site in Schwarzenburg.

Compiled by Bob Thomann in March 1988, edited by NEXUS-IBA staff in memorial of the legendary Schwarzenburg HF station shut down on March 29, 1998. Excerpts from Bob Thomann and Bob Zanotti (the Two Bobs) may be heard as part of the history and archives of the “Hello There” program. More pictures on the Schwarzenburg HF station may be found here.

More pictures of the HF station at Schwarzenburg (1938-1998)

Check the full article on the Swiss the HF station at  Schwarzenburg here